La Vida es Rara

4 notes

theviciouslily asked: Pride was everything I hoped it would be and more. BREAD AND ROSES!

gethinblake:

that’s Anna nondeducible's least favourite scene because it's so theatrical but I can forgive the theatricality for the way Gethin responds because that gets me every time

But they’re Welsh. Of course they can harmonise without any prior rehearsal.

9 notes

enjoytheelephant:

So I am on board with Mary needing to die, but just think about this for a minute: Mary in a prison spinoff.

It would only be about four episodes long before she got the other prisoners to encite a riot and then engineered her escape.

1,463 notes

gethinblake:

i can’t wait for a generation of people involved in fannish culture to grow up to be journalists and screenwriters and actors and for fandom (and female and/or queer fans in particular) to finally be treated with some respect

I know right. I don’t understand why there are so many actors out there who just don’t get what fanwork is about. I mean, isn’t part of being an actor that you love storytelling so much that you want to make yourself into a vessel for a character who you believe has a life of their own even when the text doesn’t?

(With regards to this instance specifically, it is possible that it could have been blown out of proportion. A lot of stuff in paper interviews can get condensed and lost in transcription, but nevertheless it still relates to a wider issue that’s been with us for a long time.)

(via cumberbear)

Filed under Sherlock Fic Fanfic Fanfiction BBC Sherlock Sherlock BBC

108 notes

tragic-cranky-porcelain-doll:

icekitten:

You can’t really read the small print, but this is the Choose Your Own Path  advert with what looks to be some sort of accompanying love story about a couple who found success with this “treatment”.

This is so gut-wrenchingly sad. Because it’s not an ad saying something like “We help you to get rid of that nasty problem of yours” or the like, it’s an ad baiting with a love story and the prospect of love and happiness that attracts Thomas’ attention. Because he wants all that so desperately. :(

Oh, of course. I thought it was syphillis, but this makes much more sense.

tragic-cranky-porcelain-doll:

icekitten:

You can’t really read the small print, but this is the Choose Your Own Path  advert with what looks to be some sort of accompanying love story about a couple who found success with this “treatment”.

This is so gut-wrenchingly sad. Because it’s not an ad saying something like “We help you to get rid of that nasty problem of yours” or the like, it’s an ad baiting with a love story and the prospect of love and happiness that attracts Thomas’ attention. Because he wants all that so desperately. :(

Oh, of course. I thought it was syphillis, but this makes much more sense.

Filed under Downton Abbey Downton Thomas Barrow

120 notes

http://cumberbear.tumblr.com/post/99583319062/warmth-and-constancy-95-of-the-people-who-get

warmth-and-constancy:

haffieliesel:

warmth-and-constancy:

95% of the people who get on my nerves in the Sherlock fandom are people who have no appreciation whatsoever of dark humor, which is actually central to an appreciation of this show and its characters.

Mark Gatiss talking about John Watson’s hypothetical dog…

Agree and I hope the peeps who get po faced about it never watch any episodes of the League of Gentlemen….they’ll probably think it’s a sick documentary of a Northern English town. Sherlock is reality, but slightly super-real. Taxis appear, John gets drugged, Sherlock doesn’t get addicted, no one wants a basement flat in Baker Street because of damp….like, uh….

It’s that super-reality mapped into the much loved familiar London contemporary landscape that makes it what it is…

Reblogging because A), YES, like the fact that this takes place in a world in which there exists a character whose actual job description is “criminal mastermind” and in which people come back to life after flat-lining through the POWER OF LURRRRVE should be all the evidence that viewers need that BBC Sherlock is kind-of-realistic-but-not-really, so it’s foolish to sacrifice the show’s humor for the sake of applying realistic moral standards to its characters, and B) I love that one of the examples you cited of how Sherlock’s London differs from a realistic London is that “taxis appear.” Bahaha.

I have an unnatural ability to summon taxis in London when I need them. I also have the ability to summon taxis in Liverpool, and my Scouse friend was like “HOW THE FUCK DID YOU DO THAT” when she saw it happen, because apparently available taxis in Liverpool are a mere legend. She thinks that taxis magically appear when I hold my hand out while standing on UK soil because the cabbies sense the presence of an American who will probably over-tip. Therefore I headcanon Sherlock as someone who has developed such a reputation among the black cab drivers of London as a person who is generous with his cash that they’ll shove their existing passengers out on the pavement if they see him up ahead with his arm raised.

I completely agree about the show being super-real. Just because it’s not Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace that doesn’t there isn’t a need for some willing suspension of disbelief in order to get the most out of watching it.

I agree with tokyopt that Mark Gatiss’ love of horror can’t really be used as an indicator for assessing how dark Sherlock is, THoB notwithstanding. However, I think it’s probably in the backs of the minds of a plurality, if not a majority, of British viewers, since The League of Gentlemen is what he’s best known for besides Sherlock. To be honest, up until the torture in TEH, it seemed pretty run-of-the-mill to me with regards to darkness in terms of drama as well as comedy. Part of that is I’m personally very hard to shock, but some of it is probably down to my background too. Dark humour, I think, is even more of a Northern sensibility than it is a British one. (I should clarify that I mean Scotland and the north of England in this context.) To give you an idea, here’s an example of a playground song that was doing the rounds when I was a kid.

Postman Pat, Postman Pat
Postman Pat ran over his cat.
Blood and guts were flying. 
Postman Pat was crying.
Postman Pat won’t drink and drive again.

With regards to genre and tone issues, I knew absolutely nothing about the show before I watched the first episode, so I never really had any preconceptions about what genre it was aiming for. I haven’t really thought about it until now, but I suppose I think of it as straight (*cough*) drama with the odd comedic beat here and there rather than a comedy drama. I guess I thought that THoB was a bit of a misfire, but I watched that episode as part of a group and no one else laughed. I think it was maybe meant to make the scene less serious in the grand scheme of things rather making it a joke, but unless there’s anyone here who can read Mofftison’s minds, we’ll never know for certain.

Going slightly off-topic, I didn’t find the Queen joke in ASiB funny, but then I think that might be an example of a bit of a generation gap in the queer community. When you look at something like Angels in America, which was set in the 80s, you can see that that kind of name-calling amongst gay men was par for the course, and rarely anything more than semi-good-natured ribbing between best pals who’ve been through a lot together. My generation, on the other hand, tends to categorise any sort of name-calling or slur as an Unforgivable, so I think that may have coloured my reading of that scene. It’s okay to disagree with the authors. That doesn’t necessarily mean that the writing’s bad, even if my definition of “bad” is completely subjective. 

Filed under Sherlock Sherlock BBC BBC Sherlock Dark Humour Black Comedy a scandal in belgravia The Hounds of Baskerville